Cape Verde – Turismo STP http://turismo-stp.org/ Sat, 21 May 2022 04:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://turismo-stp.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default.png Cape Verde – Turismo STP http://turismo-stp.org/ 32 32 Mum’s ‘nightmare’ after TUI flight scrapped at Birmingham airport costs her 24 hour holiday https://turismo-stp.org/mums-nightmare-after-tui-flight-scrapped-at-birmingham-airport-costs-her-24-hour-holiday/ Sat, 21 May 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/mums-nightmare-after-tui-flight-scrapped-at-birmingham-airport-costs-her-24-hour-holiday/ A mum-of-three has slammed travel giant TUI after she lost a day’s holiday in the sun when her flight was canceled causing a huge queue at Birmingham Airport. Sasha Gray and her sons were delighted with a getaway to Cape Verde – but their holiday hopes began to dim when they arrived on May 7 […]]]>

A mum-of-three has slammed travel giant TUI after she lost a day’s holiday in the sun when her flight was canceled causing a huge queue at Birmingham Airport. Sasha Gray and her sons were delighted with a getaway to Cape Verde – but their holiday hopes began to dim when they arrived on May 7 to see monster queues rolling out of the airport.

The flight was canceled for “operational reasons” and TUI offered to put Sasha and her children, aged one, two and six, at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole for free. But she said the journey to the hotel was not easy – and her family were sweating as they caught a replacement flight the next day.

Sasha, who was carrying seven bags, told BirminghamLive: “Staff told me it was a short journey – but it wasn’t a short journey. And to make matters worse, I had a trolley with seven bags and a stroller.

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“There was not a single member of staff in sight to help us get to the hotel. I was told TUI ground handling agents would help us – but that never happened product.”

Arriving at the hotel, she received an update from the airline. The family’s new flight was scheduled to take off at 1:30 p.m. the next day.



The queue outside Birmingham Airport on May 7.

But Sasha said the replacement plane was “much smaller”. With fewer seats available, she said customers who booked first got priority.

Sasha added: “Early bookings had a guaranteed place. I had only booked ten days before the departure date, so I had to wait to see if there were any no-shows.



The family luggage

“The wait has been very stressful and emotional. I was disgusted by the decision to put a young family in such distress.

“My anxiety was at a fever pitch, but I tried to stay positive. An hour passed and it finally came to the last seats.

“Fortunately, a man in front of us decided to let us take them. His decision meant he had to delay his trip.

READ MORE: Birmingham airport smuggler jailed in £1million heroin case after claims drugs were ‘planted’

“His kindness was heartwarming. I couldn’t thank him enough.”

Sasha said her family then only had 30 minutes to complete their check-in and clear security. When it appeared they wouldn’t be making the flight, a kind policeman offered to take them quickly to their gate.

Sasha added: “Other families, whom we had met the day before, welcomed us. They were shocked and in disbelief when I explained the trauma we had suffered.

“It was a very traumatic, time-consuming, stressful and emotional experience with TUI.”

Sasha added that she normally enjoys flying with the airline, but was “appalled” by the way her situation was being handled. She said she wanted full compensation.

A TUI spokeswoman told Birminghamlive: “We are sorry to hear about this family’s experience. We can confirm the flight needed to stay overnight in Birmingham while a new plane has been found, in due to operational issues.

“Hotel rooms were provided to the affected customers, who then arrived in Cape Verde on a flight the next day. We understand that the delays are frustrating for customers, and we would like to apologize for the inconvenience and thank them for their patience.”

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How plants colonize the base of an active stratovolcano https://turismo-stp.org/how-plants-colonize-the-base-of-an-active-stratovolcano/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:32:56 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/how-plants-colonize-the-base-of-an-active-stratovolcano/ New research on plants that colonized the base of an active stratovolcano reveals that two simple molecular steps rewired nutrient transport, enabling adaptation. An international team led by Angela Hancock at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne (Germany) and including scientists from Associação Projecto Vitó and Parque Natural do Fogo (Cape […]]]>

New research on plants that colonized the base of an active stratovolcano reveals that two simple molecular steps rewired nutrient transport, enabling adaptation.

An international team led by Angela Hancock at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne (Germany) and including scientists from Associação Projecto Vitó and Parque Natural do Fogo (Cape Verde), University of Nottingham (Kingdom UK) and the University of Bochum (Germany) studied a wild Thalian watercress (Arabidopsis thaliana) population that colonized the base of an active stratovolcano. They found that a two-step molecular process reconnected nutrient transport in the population. The results, published today in the journal Scientists progress, reveal an exceptionally clear case of adaptive walking in a wild population. The finding has wider implications for evolutionary biology and crop improvement.

Adapt to a new soil environment

Nutrient homeostasis is crucial for good plant growth and therefore essential for crop productivity. Identifying the genetic changes that allow plants to thrive in new soil conditions provides insight into this important process. However, given the immense size of a genome, it is difficult to identify specific functional variants that enable adaptation.

Members of the research team have previously found that wild populations of the molecular model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, commonly known as watercress thale, colonized the Cape Verde Islands from North Africa and adapted with the help of new mutations that emerged after the colonization of the islands. Here, scientists are focusing on the Fogo Island Arabid population, which grows at the base of Pico de Fogo, an active stratovolcano. “We wanted to know: What does it take to live at the foot of an active volcano? How the plants adapt Fogo’s volcanic soil?”Hancock said.

“What we found was surprising,” said Emmanuel Tergemina, the study’s first author. “While Fogo’s plants appeared to be healthy in their natural environment, they did poorly in standard potting soil.” Chemical analysis of the Fogo soils showed that they were severely depleted in manganese, a crucial element for energy production and good plant growth. In contrast, the leaves of Fogo plants grown on standard potting soil contained high levels of manganese, suggesting that the plants had evolved a mechanism to increase manganese uptake.

Two evolutionary steps towards a new adaptive peak

Scientists used a combination of genetic mapping and evolutionary analysis to uncover the molecular steps that allowed plants to colonize Fogo’s manganese-limited soil.

In a first evolutionary step, a mutation disrupted the primary iron transport gene (IRT1), eliminating its function. The disruption of this gene in a natural population was striking because this key gene exists intact in all other global populations of the Arabis species – no such disruption has been found elsewhere. Furthermore, patterns of genetic variation in the IRT1 genomic region suggest that the disrupted version of IRT1 was important in adaptation. Evolutionary reconstruction shows that the mutation quickly spread at settlement throughout the Fogo population, such that all Fogo Arabis plants now carry this mutation. Using gene editing technology (CRISPR-Cas9), researchers examined the functional effects of IRT1 disturbance at Fogo and found that it increases manganese accumulation in leaves, which may explain its role in adaptation. However, the loss of the IRT1 transporter came at a cost: it significantly reduced leaf iron.

In a second evolutionary step, the metal transporter gene NRAMP1 was duplicated in several side events. These duplications spread rapidly so that now almost all Fogo watercress plants carry multiple copies of NRAMP1 in their genomes. These duplications amplify NRAMP1 gene function, increasing iron transport and compensating iron deficiency induced by IRT1 disturbance. Moreover, amplification occurred through several independent duplication events in the island population. This was unexpected given the short time since colonization (about 5000 years) and the absence of similar events in other populations around the world. “The rapid increase in the frequency of these duplications as well as their beneficial effect on nutrient homeostasis indicate that they were important in adaptation,” Hancock explained. “Overall, our results provide an exceptionally clear example of how simple genetic changes can rewire nutrient processing in plants, enabling adaptation to a new soil environment.”

Implications for crop improvement

These results also provide encouraging news for plant breeding. Traditionally, information on gene function has come from studies of individual mutant lines. However, by using the variation that exists in nature, it is possible to uncover more complex multi-step processes that can lead to changes in traits relevant to agriculture. “The finding that a simple two-step process alters nutrient transport in this case may offer clues for approaches to improve crops to better adapt to local soil environments. Additionally, disturbance and l amplification of genes, as in the case of IRT1 and NRAMP1 in Fogo, are some of the easiest genetic changes to engineer, which makes them particularly exciting because it means they could be easily transferable to other species,” concluded Tergemina.

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Cape Verde shipwreck museum recalls a dark past – OpEd – Eurasia Review https://turismo-stp.org/cape-verde-shipwreck-museum-recalls-a-dark-past-oped-eurasia-review/ Tue, 17 May 2022 01:19:54 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/cape-verde-shipwreck-museum-recalls-a-dark-past-oped-eurasia-review/ By Lisa Vives The Republic of Cape Verde (Cape Verde) is an island archipelago west of Senegal and Mauritania, made up of 10 volcanic islands located between 320 and 460 nautical miles west of Cape Verde, the highest point westernmost part of mainland Africa. The official language is Portuguese, the language of education and government […]]]>

By Lisa Vives

The Republic of Cape Verde (Cape Verde) is an island archipelago west of Senegal and Mauritania, made up of 10 volcanic islands located between 320 and 460 nautical miles west of Cape Verde, the highest point westernmost part of mainland Africa.

The official language is Portuguese, the language of education and government and in newspapers, television and radio, but the recognized national language is Cape Verdean Creole, spoken by the vast majority of the population.

A large Cape Verdean diaspora community exists throughout the world, particularly in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and in Portugal, greatly exceeding the number of islanders.

New discoveries by archaeologists have brought to light new evidence of Cape Verde‘s role in the transatlantic slave trade.

Charles Akibode, director of the Cape Verde Institute of Cultural Heritage, says nations often send pirates to do their dirty work.

The Portuguese colonization of Cape Verde (Cabo Verde) began in 1462. Initially envisaged as a base allowing sailors direct access to West African trade, the central Atlantic islands quickly became a major hub for the slave trade. Atlantic.

Enslaved Africans were used on the islands’ sugar cane plantations and sold to ships sailing to the Americas. The islands gained independence from Portugal in 1975.

Since Cape Verde was much further from Portugal than the other Atlantic colonies (about two weeks sailing), the islands attracted fewer European settlers, especially women. As a result, Europeans and Africans intermarried on the islands, creating an Afro-Portuguese culture with strong African religious and artistic influence.

The Museu dos Náufragos (Shipwreck Museum), on the island of Boa Vista in Cape Verde, has reopened two years after the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Here, the story is told from the period of discoveries, slavery, isolation, survival, drought and Creole culture.

The Museum is the result of two decades of work by Maurizio Rossi, an Italian archaeologist.

“This is a three-story museum that begins in the darkest part of history,” Rossi said. “Hundreds of artifacts are on display here, such as finds from the wreckage of historic ships off Boa Vista, pieces from the period of pirate attacks on the island, or the shipment of African slaves towards the Americas and, also, Cape Verdean art, and its evolution during the meeting of cultures.

During the 19th century and into the 20th century, a law enacted by the Portuguese government in 1899 allowed the authorities to impose any type of work, regardless of salary or undesirable situation, on any unemployed man. This allowed the government to keep the workforce on the cocoa plantations during another severe famine in 1902-1903.

By the 1950s, protest was mounting throughout Portuguese Africa. A group of Cape Verdeans and people from the mainland colony of Guinea-Bissau, led by Amilcar Cabral, joined forces to organize the Partido Africano de Independencia de Guine e Cabo Verde (PAIGC).

Those who resisted politically were subjected to the terrors of the Portuguese secret police, and sometimes imprisoned in the concentration camp of Tarrafal, in Sao Tiago. Built in 1936, it operated until 1956. It reopened in 1962, as “Chão Bom Labor Camp”, with the aim of incarcerating anti-colonial activists from Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Cabo Verde .

On April 25, 1974, the Portuguese government was overthrown. The new Portuguese government was ready to destroy its former colonies, but reconsidered, believing that it could still control the colonies with puppet governments. The Cape Verdeans resist, support the PAIGC, and general strikes are called. The government surrendered when all services and production ceased.

Independence Day was instituted on July 5, 1975, and is celebrated by Cape Verdeans around the world. Many music lovers now know Cape Verde for the breathtaking work of singer Cesaria Evora.

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African countries censor the internet the most — Quartz Africa https://turismo-stp.org/african-countries-censor-the-internet-the-most-quartz-africa/ Fri, 13 May 2022 15:10:37 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/african-countries-censor-the-internet-the-most-quartz-africa/ As Africa‘s Future Depends on Technology Adoption—particularly in providing fast, reliable and affordable internet connectivity—many African governments are rushing to shut down the internet when it serves them well. Over the past four years, citizens of nearly half of African countries have experienced an internet outage. In all cases, the shutdowns occurred during conflicts or […]]]>

As Africa‘s Future Depends on Technology Adoptionparticularly in providing fast, reliable and affordable internet connectivitymany African governments are rushing to shut down the internet when it serves them well.

Over the past four years, citizens of nearly half of African countries have experienced an internet outage.

In all cases, the shutdowns occurred during conflicts or during elections, with incumbent governments blocking online access to political information.

This has had a detrimental effect on the general African economy which is still at the bottom of the global digital economy. The twilight of the Internet has meant thousands of lost hours for businesses that operate online through e-commerce and social commerce, and this has resulted in the loss of billions of dollars. In 2019, internet and social media shutdowns cost the continent more than $2 billion.

African online businesses have lost thousands of working hours

In Ethiopia, a combined total of 3,657 hours were lost and cost the country $100 millionthe first having taken place from January 2020 to the end of June 2020 in western Oromia according to the British technological research company Comparitech.

Another followed in November 2020 in the Tigray region after the outbreak of war and lasted until December 15, when some services were restored.

The Twitter ban in Nigeria from June 5, 2021 to January 13, 2022 affected an estimated 104.4 million internet users in the country and cost the country an estimated $367 million according to Welsh VPN company Top10VPN.

Comparitech estimates that in Uganda’s 2020 presidential election, “the pearl of Africa” ​​lost $10 million in business revenue in 30 days. The government has arrested those who attempt to access social media through virtual private networks (VPNs). The country has also implemented a social media tax.

Internet and social media shutdowns cost Africa billions

In 2020, Chad experienced the longest shutdown, WhatsApp being blocked for 3,912 hours at a total cost of over $20 million. The shutdown began on July 22 and was continuing through the end of the year.

Tanzania, whose government has truncated media freedom since 2015, experienced an internet blackout that lasted 1,584 hours in 2020 and cost more than $600 million.

In 2019, a Top10VPN report indicated that a total of 12 African governments disabled internet services, resulting in a $2 billion combined loss. These are Sudan, Algeria, Chad, DRC, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, Mauritania, Egypt, Benin, Gabon, Eritrea and Liberia.

Zimbabwe, Togo, Burundi, Chad, Mali and Guinea also restricted access to the internet or social media apps in 2020.

In 2019, there were 25 documented cases of partial or full internet shutdowns, compared to 20 in 2018 and 12 in 2017, according to Access Now, an independent monitoring group.

In 2018, Sudanese authorities cut internet access for 68 consecutive days to quell protests that culminated in the following year’s military coup. In June and July 2019, Sudan was plunged into “a more extensive mobile internet shutdown” for another 36 days. In total, he lost $2 billion.

Internet and social media access was cut hours before the March 21, 2021 general elections in the Republic of Congo.

In April 2022, Kenya has distanced itself from a US listing among 60 signatories to an agreement that commits members to arbitrarily shut down the internet.

Kenya, Cape Verde, Niger and Senegal were the only African countries on the US-led “Declaration for the Future of the Internet” (DFI) list.

The DFI also urges member countries to refrain from using the internet to undermine electoral infrastructure and influence election results.

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Brockton Nicalas Fernandes receives Olympic scholarship https://turismo-stp.org/brockton-nicalas-fernandes-receives-olympic-scholarship/ Tue, 10 May 2022 09:01:31 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/brockton-nicalas-fernandes-receives-olympic-scholarship/ The 2024 Olympics in Paris once seemed like a long way off. But now that they are fast approaching, they don’t even seem real for Nicalas Fernandes. Once a taekwondo prodigy, the Brockton native has been chosen by the International Olympic Committee to receive one of 10 scholarships offered to Cape Verdean athletes hoping to […]]]>

The 2024 Olympics in Paris once seemed like a long way off.

But now that they are fast approaching, they don’t even seem real for Nicalas Fernandes.

Once a taekwondo prodigy, the Brockton native has been chosen by the International Olympic Committee to receive one of 10 scholarships offered to Cape Verdean athletes hoping to land their tickets to Paris in two years.

“It hasn’t really hit yet, but it’s starting to sink in now,” said Fernandes, a sophomore at Merrimack College. “It’s mind-boggling trying to figure out how big, myself.”

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In receiving the scholarship, Fernandes was honored by the Cape Verdean Association of Brockton last month. He received the scholarship in the presence of local municipal leaders, such as Mayor Robert Sullivan, Councilman Moises Rodrigues and State Representative Michelle DuBoise.

“It was a very proud moment, a very happy moment,” Fernandes said. “They basically noticed all the hard work I’ve been doing lately.”

Left to right, Senator Michael Brady, of Brockton;  Brockton City Councilor Rita Mendes;  Nancy Demacedo-Fernandes;  Brockton Mayor Robert Sullivan;  and general counsel Moises Rodrigues watch Nicalas Fenrandes sign his contract for an Olympic scholarship on Monday, April 11, 2022, on which he hopes to qualify for the 2024 Summer Olympics taekwondo competition to be held in Paris.

And by “recently,” Fernandes is referring to his entire life.

He started training in martial arts at the age of 6, starting with karate. Four years later, he switched to taekwondo at the age of 10. It was then that he started competing in tournaments, both locally and around the world. He came close to qualifying for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo during a race in Morocco a few years ago.

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EasyJet removes seats to be able to fly with less crew https://turismo-stp.org/easyjet-removes-seats-to-be-able-to-fly-with-less-crew/ Sun, 08 May 2022 14:54:07 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/easyjet-removes-seats-to-be-able-to-fly-with-less-crew/ EasyJet will remove seats on some of its planes so it can operate flights with fewer cabin crew, according to reports. the BBC said the summer changes would come into effect as the airline battles staff shortages. It comes as passenger numbers return to pre-pandemic levels. Airports across the UK, including Birmingham Airport, have felt […]]]>

EasyJet will remove seats on some of its planes so it can operate flights with fewer cabin crew, according to reports. the BBC said the summer changes would come into effect as the airline battles staff shortages.

It comes as passenger numbers return to pre-pandemic levels. Airports across the UK, including Birmingham Airport, have felt the pressure, with travelers reporting long wait times to clear security.

By removing the rear row of seats from its A319 fleet, EasyJet said it would be able to fly with three cabin crew members instead of four. This would limit the number on board to a maximum of 150 passengers.

UPDATES: Birmingham Airport LIVE after TUI passengers left queue outside over busy weekend

And the airline has insisted flights will still adhere to Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) regulations on the required number of cabin crew. An EasyJet spokesperson said: “This summer we will operate our UK fleet of A319s with a maximum of 150 passengers on board and three crew members in accordance with CAA regulations.”

Meanwhile, travel giant TUI has apologized to passengers stuck in a huge queue so big it squeezed through the gates of Birmingham Airport. Yesterday (7 May) saw a huge queue of customers outside in the latest issue to hit the air hub.

TUI confirmed that the problem was caused by a delayed flight to Cape Verde and apologized to the travelers affected. A spokesperson said: “We can confirm that due to a delayed TUI flight to Cape Verde, some customers experienced longer wait times at Birmingham Airport this morning.

“We would like to apologize to the affected customers and thank them for their patience and understanding.”

Do you have a story about Birmingham Airport? Contact us by emailing josh.sandiford@reachplc.com

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Cape Verde receives ECOWAS members https://turismo-stp.org/cape-verde-receives-ecowas-members/ Fri, 06 May 2022 17:56:00 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/cape-verde-receives-ecowas-members/ Dan Kovalik, professor of human rights at the University of Pittsburgh Daniel Kovalik, professor of HR, questions such nonsense, after from the island of Sal none of the decisions made by ECOWAS were taken into account. DORAL, FLORIDA, USA, May 6, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — ECOWAS, whose Court of Justice was established in 1993, has moved […]]]>

Dan Kovalik, professor of human rights at the University of Pittsburgh

Daniel Kovalik, professor of HR, questions such nonsense, after from the island of Sal none of the decisions made by ECOWAS were taken into account.

DORAL, FLORIDA, USA, May 6, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — ECOWAS, whose Court of Justice was established in 1993, has moved from an initial focus on cross-border trade issues to include a prominent human rights mandate on the continent. The Tribunal itself has grown in stature and is now recognized as one of the most respected human rights tribunals in Africa and around the world.

The Court’s annual international conference, held this year under the theme “The Integration Model: The Legal Implications of Regionalism, Sovereignty and Supranationalism; will take place in Cape Verde from May 9 to 12 and is an important event, which offers the opportunity to know the role of the Court in legal cases that concern the highest entity. “This is particularly true with regard to the recognition given to the Court for its work in promoting human rights, which makes the selection of Cape Verde as the host country of the Conference more confusing and disappointing, according to the comments by Daniel Kovalik, professor of international human rights at the University of Pittsburgh.

Kovalik insists the Cape Verdean regime has frequently shown contempt for the Tribunal and openly flouted its attempts to subvert protocols for political convenience. Specifically, he explains, “the Cape Verdean regime’s actions in the case of Venezuela’s special envoy, Alex Saab, were motivated solely by the desire to do whatever was necessary to please the United States in their well-documented quest for political hegemony against Venezuela.”

Suffice it to say that, despite bizarre statements to the contrary, Cape Verde actively and fully participated in the judicial process that led the Tribunal to declare not once, but twice in 2021, that the detention of Alex Saab by the African country was “illegal, that he be released immediately and that the extradition procedure that was in progress against him be terminated”, explains the professor, who recalls that ECOWAS received a response of the Cape Verdean president after the forced expulsion of Saab to the United States: “We are a country with international commitments (sic)… We must give something in return for our participation in cooperative security.”

What seems most absurd to Kovalik, a Columbia University law graduate, is that offering Cape Verde an opportunity to brag about its self-proclaimed position as a “model African democracy” is tantamount to self-harm on the part of those who made the decision. hold the Conference in that country.

The professor argues that Cape Verde’s deliberate act of detaining a diplomat who is entitled to clear and unequivocal immunity and inviolability sets a dangerous precedent as it throws away centuries of international law “The attribution of the Conference in Cape Verde must be recognized as an error of judgment on the part of the ECOWAS Secretariat and the Tribunal must distance itself from the decision-making process that gave rise to it,” he concludes.

About Daniel Kovalik

Daniel Kovalik is a graduate of Columbia University School of Law and teaches international human rights law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

Joe Marshall
Miami News Agency
write to us here

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Seabourn unveils new 2023/24 expedition routes https://turismo-stp.org/seabourn-unveils-new-2023-24-expedition-routes/ Wed, 04 May 2022 13:14:01 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/seabourn-unveils-new-2023-24-expedition-routes/ Seabourn has unveiled its new Fall, Winter and Spring 2023-2024 expedition itineraries for its Seabourn Venture and Seabourn Pursuit vessels, which are set to visit breathtaking destinations in Antarctica, South America, the South Pacific, Indonesia and more. The eleven crossings aboard the Seabourn Venture will take place between September 2023 and April 2024 and will […]]]>

Seabourn has unveiled its new Fall, Winter and Spring 2023-2024 expedition itineraries for its Seabourn Venture and Seabourn Pursuit vessels, which are set to visit breathtaking destinations in Antarctica, South America, the South Pacific, Indonesia and more.

The eleven crossings aboard the Seabourn Venture will take place between September 2023 and April 2024 and will last between 14 and 24 days. In September, the ship will sail from Japan to the South Pacific, reaching New Zealand in December for a voyage to Antarctica, where it will begin its Antarctic season. Then it will return to Australia and New Zealand before ending in Bali in March 2024.

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One of these unique journeys is the 22-day sailing from Kobe to Brisbane (Honiara), which takes travelers to Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Okinawa in Japan, Micronesia and ends in Brisbane, Australia.

The Seabourn Pursuit, meanwhile, will offer fourteen different crossings ranging from 11 to 27 days from September 2023 to April 2024. It will start in the Northwest Passage before spending its winter in Antarctica. In February, the ship will sail from Argentina to Africa, where it will take routes along the northwest coast of Africa and Europe to London.

One of these itineraries aboard Seabourn Pursuit is the 27-day transatlantic voyage from Buenos Aires to Cape Verde. The journey begins in Tierra del Fuego, visits the Falklands, Tristan da Cunha and Ascension Island before ending in Cape Verde, the islands off the northwest coast of Africa.

“It is our privilege to open the world to those who desire adventurous experiences, and we are thrilled to unveil another series of expedition itineraries that reach the farthest corners of the globe,” said the president of Seabourn, Josh Leibowitz. “Seabourn Venture and Seabourn Pursuit are setting a new bar for luxury expedition travel.

These voyages are the second group to be published by Seabourn this spring; in April, the cruise line released its 2023-24 itineraries in Asia, the Middle East, New Zealand and other parts of the world.

For more information, please Click here.

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Kenya: This is how the Kenyan passport ranks in the world 2022 https://turismo-stp.org/kenya-this-is-how-the-kenyan-passport-ranks-in-the-world-2022/ Mon, 02 May 2022 11:51:04 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/kenya-this-is-how-the-kenyan-passport-ranks-in-the-world-2022/ Each year, an index ranking passports is published, informing the world of the countries enjoying the greatest freedom of travel. So what makes a passport powerful? According to the Henley Passport Index, mobility score (visa-free travel) is not the only thing that matters when it comes to passport rankings. Additional factors such as global reach, […]]]>

Each year, an index ranking passports is published, informing the world of the countries enjoying the greatest freedom of travel.

So what makes a passport powerful?

According to the Henley Passport Index, mobility score (visa-free travel) is not the only thing that matters when it comes to passport rankings. Additional factors such as global reach, global perception, taxes and the ability to obtain dual citizenship come into play.

The Kenyan passport is currently in the top 10 most powerful passports in Africa, on a list topping Seychelles and Mauritius. The other countries are South Africa, Botswana, Ghana, Tunisia, Namibia, Morocco and Lesotho.

Overall, the Kenyan passport is not so well ranked. In terms of mobility score – the countries that a person with a Kenyan passport can visit without a visa or where they can obtain a visa on arrival, Kenya ranks 68th.

Kenyan citizens can travel visa-free to 34 countries, obtain visa on arrival or e-visa in 33 countries, and a visa is required to travel to the remaining 130 countries and territories.

With the number of cases around the world falling, many countries are easing their requirements for visitors to be tested or quarantined. Some countries, however, currently have a COVID-19 ban for Kenyan passport holders.

Kenyan? Here are the countries you can travel to easily and those with a COVID-19 ban.

VISA NOT MANDATORY

1) Antigua and Barbuda

2) Bahamas

3) Barbados

4) Benin

5) Botswana

6) Burundi

7) Cuba

8) Dominica

9) Eswatini

10) Eritrea

11) Ethiopia

12) Fiji

13) Gambia

14) Ghana

15) Pomegranate

16) Haiti

17) Hong Kong

18) Indonesia

19) Jamaica

20) Kiribati

21) Lesotho

22) Mali

23) Malaysia

24) Mauritius

25) Namibia

26) Panama

27) Philippines

28) Rwanda

29) Saint Kitts and Nevis

30) Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

31) Senegal

32) Singapore

33) Swaziland

34) Tanzania

35) Trinidad and Tobago

36) Uganda

37) Vanuatu

38) Zambia

39) Zimbabwe

VISA ON ARRIVAL & E-VISA

1) Angola (pre-visa on arrival)

2) Bolivia

3) Burkina Faso

4) Cambodia

5) Cape Verde

6) Comoros

7) Democratic Republic of the Congo

8) Djibouti (eVisa)

9) Gabon

10) Guinea (eVisa)

11) Guinea-Bissau

12) India (eVisa)

13) Iran (eVisa)

14) Jordan

15) Madagascar (eVisa)

16) Maldives

17) Mauritania

18) Mozambique

19) Nepal

20) Nigeria

21) Palau

22) Papua New Guinea (eVisa)

23) Saint Lucia

24) Samoa

25) Seychelles

26) Sierra Leone