São Tomé – Turismo STP http://turismo-stp.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:54:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://turismo-stp.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default.png São Tomé – Turismo STP http://turismo-stp.org/ 32 32 São Tomé and Príncipe becomes a member of the FiTI https://turismo-stp.org/sao-tome-and-principe-becomes-a-member-of-the-fiti/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:54:22 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/sao-tome-and-principe-becomes-a-member-of-the-fiti/ The African island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe has announced a new resolution to join the Fisheries Transparency Initiative (FiTI). The country – whose population depends on fish as its main source of protein – is now the sixth country committed to increasing the transparency of its fisheries management thanks to the FiTI standard, […]]]>

The African island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe has announced a new resolution to join the Fisheries Transparency Initiative (FiTI).

The country – whose population depends on fish as its main source of protein – is now the sixth country committed to increasing the transparency of its fisheries management thanks to the FiTI standard, after Mauritania, Seychelles, Senegal, Cape Verde and Madagascar, according to a statement. by FITI.

Sao Tome and Principe Agriculture, Fisheries and Rural Development Minister Francisco Martins dos Ramos said his country “recognized early on that its precious fisheries resources were being exploited beyond sustainable levels, by domestic and foreign fleets. , and in a non-transparent and non-inclusive manner”.

“Therefore, we seek to create mechanisms to reverse this trend and help regenerate the exploitation of fisheries resources through the development of a sustainable fisheries management system based on fisheries research, fisheries administration and a system inspection,” the minister said in a letter to FiTI. President of the International Council Valeria Merino.

With the country’s commitment to join the FiTI, the next phase will be to complete the steps required to submit an official application.

A first country mission of the FiTI International Secretariat is planned for February and March 2022.

The country has a capacity to catch around 29,000 metric tonnes of fish per year and, by committing to adhere to the FiTI standard, it has committed to start implementing transparency initiatives supported by the group. .

According to the FiTI, the standard “provides governments, the fishing industry and civil society with a comprehensive and credible means of achieving and maintaining high levels of transparency over the management of the marine fishing sector and the activities of fishermen and fishing enterprises”.

FiTI Global has listed Comoros, Ecuador, Lebanon, Mexico, Mauritius and Peru as target countries for its membership drive.

The fisheries of São Tomé and Príncipe are exclusively artisanal and largely focused on small pelagics. Through its involvement with the FiTI, the country also plans to engage stakeholders across the value chain to remain consistent with the objectives of the FiTI.

An earlier commitment from São Tomé and Príncipe to join the FiTI in 2018 was delayed after the country’s change of government in 2019. The process was relaunched in November 2020, with a commitment between the FiTI International Secretariat and key parties seafood stakeholders in the country – including government, business and civil society collaborators with support from MAR Ambiente e Pesca Artesanal (MARAPA) – a FiTI Global partner.

“With this commitment, the government of São Tomé and Príncipe is setting a milestone for transparency in the management of its marine fisheries,” said FiTI Global.

“Transparent commercial and financial flows in the fisheries sector can help the country achieve more responsible, equitable and profitable fisheries, while better governance will reassure potential investors and attract more foreign investment,” the Commission said. FiTI.

Photo courtesy of Cesar J. Pollo/Shutterstock

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CDC Warns Americans to Avoid Country Due to COVID-19 https://turismo-stp.org/cdc-warns-americans-to-avoid-country-due-to-covid-19/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:44:32 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/cdc-warns-americans-to-avoid-country-due-to-covid-19/ Trips to the Great White North might have to wait; Federal officials in the United States are warning travelers to avoid Canada due to its “very high” level of COVID-19. On Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention upgraded Canada from its Level 3 Travel Health Advisory to Level 4, the highest alert level. […]]]>

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Lecturer at the University of Bristol on slavery and the dark past of two more prominent names https://turismo-stp.org/lecturer-at-the-university-of-bristol-on-slavery-and-the-dark-past-of-two-more-prominent-names/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/lecturer-at-the-university-of-bristol-on-slavery-and-the-dark-past-of-two-more-prominent-names/ The overthrow of the statue of slave trader and philanthropist Edward Colston last June, and the subsequent trial and acquittal of Colston 4, sparked a push for change within many institutions. University of Bristol lecturer and historian Richard Stone, who specializes in the history of the transatlantic slave economy, believes it is crucial to examine […]]]>

The overthrow of the statue of slave trader and philanthropist Edward Colston last June, and the subsequent trial and acquittal of Colston 4, sparked a push for change within many institutions.

University of Bristol lecturer and historian Richard Stone, who specializes in the history of the transatlantic slave economy, believes it is crucial to examine the broader role of charity and slavery in Bristol.

On January 13, Dr Stone will host a talk at the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery exploring the Wills and Fry families’ tobacco and chocolate trade, respectively, and how they established their fortunes in real life.

READ MORE: Mayor says Bristol needs to move on from Colston ‘drama’

Prior to the conference, Dr Stone spoke to Bristol Live on the role of families in using slavery to produce ingredients, despite their philanthropic work in the abolition of slavery.

He said: “My work began by researching the links between slavery and my own institution, the University of Bristol, which led me to the two families, the Wills and Fry families.

“They were major donors to the University but also to other institutions across the city, including the museum among them. So I wanted to talk about them because of their links to slavery and their impact in the city.

Dr Stone’s attention turned to both families in 2017, when an online petition was created by students at the University to rename the Wills Memorial Building due to the benefactor’s ties to slavery.

This prompted him to expand his research, with the goal of examining not only the money that was offered, but more importantly, how that money was earned.



Dr Richard Stone, Senior Lecturer at the University of Bristol, specializing in slavery and the Atlantic economy from the 15th to the 20th century

Dr Stone said, “We can discuss the technical details of the reasoning that they made a lot of money from slavery, but ultimately they made the majority of the money after slavery was abolished.

“But the other thing is that slavery and other exploitative practices like slavery continued well beyond what we consider to be the date of abolition, in 1833 or 1863 in the United States. .

“For example, in the case of the Fry family, where some would call indentured servitude – but I would certainly call it slavery.”

He referred to “frankly horrible labor practices” which he said were identified by the research.

Dr Stone said: “In Portuguese São Tomé, it turns out that at the end of 1909 itself, the Fry family were sourcing their cocoa beans from São Tomé, a Portuguese island off the African coast.

“Slavery was abolished there in 1873, but when you read the labor practices there and the roots of ‘indentured servants’ were bought off the coast of Nigeria and shipped to São Tomé.

“The corpses, irons, chains seen along the road, do you think – in fact, a century after the abolition of the slave trade, that hasn’t changed much.”




Dr Stone pointed out that such practices not only benefit families’ businesses, but also the institutions they heavily fund, including the University of Bristol.

He explained: “The big problem is that the sums of money that went into these institutions. For example, the Wills family contributed more than 60 percent of donations to the university in its first 50 years.

“It’s very difficult to convert to modern sums of money, but we’re talking about £ 600million and up, so it’s really a huge importance that these families have in the city today.

“I don’t think I even realized how big a role they played – how much to think about it, being part of the college that made my career and my life in so many ways, how I in turn gone through this, i am a beneficiary of slavery.

Dr Stone hopes his next lecture can help enlighten others to understand Bristol’s history in order to advance the city and its institutions.

He adds that by taking responsibility for the past, there is an opportunity to become an effective champion of diversity and inclusion.

Dr Stone said: “A lot of people care about this as we saw with the Colston 4 trial and it’s a big deal in the city, with people on both sides engaging on what’s good and bad in terms of remembering the past.

“For me, it’s really important to talk about these things so that we don’t deepen the divisions in our society today.

“We really need to get all the information out there, have an informed discussion about it, and then hopefully that means we can move forward being more united than a less fractured society.”

More information about the free online lecture can be found on the Bristol Museum website.

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Light-fingered monkeys threaten critically endangered Príncipe’s lily of the valley https://turismo-stp.org/light-fingered-monkeys-threaten-critically-endangered-principes-lily-of-the-valley/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 07:27:34 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/light-fingered-monkeys-threaten-critically-endangered-principes-lily-of-the-valley/ Camera traps have confirmed suspicions that mona monkeys eat the eggs of the critically endangered Príncipe thrush. Monkeys and several other invasive species were brought to the then uninhabited islands of Príncipe and São Tomé by Portuguese sailors from the 15th century. Conservation authorities are considering allowing monkey hunting in the Príncipe Natural Park to […]]]>
  • Camera traps have confirmed suspicions that mona monkeys eat the eggs of the critically endangered Príncipe thrush.
  • Monkeys and several other invasive species were brought to the then uninhabited islands of Príncipe and São Tomé by Portuguese sailors from the 15th century.
  • Conservation authorities are considering allowing monkey hunting in the Príncipe Natural Park to reduce their numbers, but more research is needed to understand their place in the ecology.

Environmentalists using camera traps have obtained evidence showing that mona monkeys from Príncipe Island off the coast of central Africa pinch the eggs of Príncipe’s thrush, a critically endangered species with a total population of estimated at less than 250.

Although this was considered probable, until now there was no strong evidence to prove that the apes (Mona cercopithecus) were stealing the nests of Príncipe’s thrush (Turdus xanthorhynchus), a starling-sized bird with an olive-brown back, white-speckled breast and bright yellow beak.

Mona monkeys arrived in Príncipe and its sister island São Tomé centuries ago, possibly as pets of Portuguese sailors. The islands, now the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, lie in the Gulf of Guinea.

A mona monkey caught in a camera trap. Image courtesy of Fundaçao Príncipe.
Mona monkeys arrived in Príncipe and its sister island São Tomé centuries ago, possibly as pets of Portuguese sailors.

Originally uninhabited and covered with evergreen forest, São Tomé and Principe were colonized by Portugal in the 1470s. In addition to monkeys, sailors also brought with them dogs, cats, pigs, African rats, mice and civets (Civettictis civetta) through the centuries.

“This is indeed a very global problem – invasive species – and there is so much to discover and do that I think we are only beginning to see the tip of the iceberg,” Estrela said. Matilde, Executive Director of Fundaçao Príncipe, a local conservation NGO that studies the impact of these introduced mammals on Príncipe’s thrush and other native species.

The camera traps were set to monitor 55 artificial nests of thrushes baited with quail eggs during a survey conducted from September 2020 to August 2021 in the Príncipe Natural Park, the last stronghold of the bird in the south of the ‘Isle.

Of the 55 nests, 42% were stolen by animals within six days, wrote a team led by Fundação Príncipe in a brief report published in the journal Oryx. The Mona monkeys were responsible for 18% of these events. The other predators could not be identified. Matilde told Mongabay it was because the footage was overexposed or the cameras were malfunctioning.

One of the active thrush nests monitored by the team was visited five times by mona monkeys until parent birds abandoned it on July 6.

These results offer “convincing evidence that the reproductive activity of this critically endangered bird is disrupted by mona monkeys,” say the authors.

A mona monkey raiding caught red-handed. Image courtesy of Fundaçao Príncipe.

Prior to this study, only one Príncipe thrush nest had been found. The Fundação Príncipe team found four nests of active thrushes, which are woven from moss and plant roots and nestled in rocky cavities and trees. They didn’t see any eggs or chicks, although the team spotted two young thrushes in late 2020.

The monkeys were probably not the only ones responsible for the theft of the nests. A 2019 survey found other potential predators at thrush breeding sites.

“We have pictures of the highest peaks, and there are cats and dogs there and there are rats everywhere,” said Matilde, noting that the rats are often stealthy enough to avoid setting off camera traps. and can be responsible for a large number of nest thefts. .

Mona monkeys are a popular game species with local hunters, but this pressure has pushed them into the Príncipe Natural Park where hunting is prohibited, and their numbers have increased inside the park.

Matilde says plans are being made to allow controlled hunting in the park to reduce their numbers in an attempt to protect the thrush. But each intervention must be carefully considered.

“We don’t yet understand the dynamic between invasive and native and there may be a certain balance that can be upset if we start hunting monkeys,” she said.

Support from the island’s hunters could help researchers in another way, by shedding light on exactly what the animals are eating. Forty-three samples were taken from stomachs of monkeys slaughtered by hunters in the buffer zone and forests around the park and sent to a laboratory in Portugal for analysis.

The stomach contents of three civets were also sent. The results are not yet available.

Martim Melo, Center for Biodiversity and Genetic Resources Research at the University of Porto, Portugal, said that while controlled hunting of monkeys in the park can reduce the pressure on lily of the valley and benefit several other species, complete eradication of invasive mammals is usually the only practical solution.

However Melo, who was not involved in the Oryx study, said that this is rarely possible. In Principe, where monkey meat provides both food and income for islanders, it is also reportedly unpopular.

Melo and his colleagues conducted a study in 2007 that listed Príncipe’s lily of the valley as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. They also used analyzes of the song, DNA and physical traits of the thrush to confirm it as a distinct species from the São Tomé thrush (Turdus olivaceofuscus).

The two had been combined into a single species since 1924, initially masking threats to Príncipe’s Thrush.

Its struggle for survival, compared to that of the thriving São Tomé thrush just 150 kilometers (93 miles) away, has sparked much speculation among scientists.

The Príncipe’s Thrush is now listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Image courtesy of Fundaçao Príncipe.

“We have always wondered whether the introduction of mona monkeys resulted in the extinction of several species before their discovery for science, and whether the native bird community that we see now represents the species able to withstand their pressure – the Príncipe’s thrush being a case of a species that struggles to do so, ”said Melo.

In addition to having different songs and different plumage, a key trait that distinguishes the Príncipe’s Thrush from its São Tomé relative is its docility.

This is something Matilde of the Fundação Principe witnessed nine years ago after leaving Portugal to settle on the island.

She and a group of friends were camping at Pico Mesa, a large mountain in Príncipe Natural Park. Matilde had lugged heavy cameras, binoculars and even a telescope to the top in the hopes of spotting a Principe thrush. She didn’t see any there, but back at the campsite the next day, one of the birds approached her friend out of curiosity as she crouched in the undergrowth, peeing. Matilde told her friend not to move while she photographed the bird, much to her friend’s frustration.

After this encounter, Príncipe’s thrush held a “very special place in my heart,” said Matilde. “They seem to see no evil in the world.”


Banner image: A Principe thrush. Image courtesy of Fundaçao Príncipe.

Quotes:

Guedes, P., Dos Santos, Y., De Lima, RF, & Bird, TL (2021). The introduced mona monkey is a major threat to Príncipe’s Thrush, a critically endangered species. Oryx, 55(6), 809-809. doi: 10.1017 / s0030605321001198

Dallimer, M., Melo, M., Collar, NJ and Jones, PJ (2010). The Thrush Principe Turdus xanthorhynchus: A flagship species of the newly divided forest, “critically endangered”. International Bird Conservation, 20(4), 375-381. doi: 10.1017 / s0959270910000390

FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do so at the bottom of the page.

Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically endangered species, Endangered species, Environment, Extinction, Hunting, Invasive species, Islands, Monkeys, Primates, Protected areas, Fauna, Wildlife conservation, Wildlife rehabilitation


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WFP Country Profile Sao Tome and Principe, November 2021 – Sao Tome and Principe https://turismo-stp.org/wfp-country-profile-sao-tome-and-principe-november-2021-sao-tome-and-principe/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:13 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/wfp-country-profile-sao-tome-and-principe-november-2021-sao-tome-and-principe/ In numbers Net financing requirement of USD 1.9 million over six months (November 2021 – April 2022). 50,000 people assisted in November 2021 Operational updates • In November, WFP assisted 50,000 school-aged children and their families. While the school feeding program will resume in January 2022, WFP and PNASE (National School Feeding and Health Program) […]]]>

In numbers

Net financing requirement of USD 1.9 million over six months (November 2021 – April 2022).

50,000 people assisted in November 2021

Operational updates

• In November, WFP assisted 50,000 school-aged children and their families. While the school feeding program will resume in January 2022, WFP and PNASE (National School Feeding and Health Program) have decided to distribute take-home rations, as part of emergency food aid, to mitigate the social and economic effects of COVID-19. This assistance therefore includes children enrolled in the local school feeding program, kindergarten children and their families.

• In November, a contribution of $ 1 million from the Common Fund for the SDGs was confirmed and will be received in 2022. The fund will be distributed among four United Nations agencies, which will be the implementing partners of the project: WFP, UN-HABITAT,
UNFPA and ILO. WFP, in collaboration with the three United Nations agencies, will implement a project aimed at promoting local food value chains and equitable employment opportunities through a sustainable agribusiness industry in the country. The pilot will be implemented in a community reflecting the broader issues presented for the small-scale agricultural sector:
Uba Budo. The project will last 24 months, from January 1, 2022 to December 31, 2023.

• On November 9, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Rural Development (MAPDR) presented the 2021 Agricultural Production Survey, a study prepared in collaboration with the National Institute of Statistics (INE) and financed by WFP and the African Development Bank (AfDB). With the territorial diagnosis launched on World Food Day 2021 and with the support of the registration system of farmers in São Tomé and Príncipe, they are useful tools to develop better agricultural policies and provide data to inform a adequate planning of government actions.

• On November 22, the Minister of Education and Higher Education, PNASE and partners validated a WFP assessment of national capacities and the framework for a sustainable local school feeding program in the country. Methodology developed by the World Bank in close collaboration with WFP and the Partnership for Children and Development (PCD), the SABER – SF study (Systematic Approach to Better Education Outcomes – School Feeding) aims to produce data and information on the education sector. Fieldwork for this exercise took place throughout November and was based on extensive consultation with PNASE stakeholders – through interviews and visits to schools in all districts.


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Review 2021: Landslides for African incumbents, the Zambian opposition upsets Lungu https://turismo-stp.org/review-2021-landslides-for-african-incumbents-the-zambian-opposition-upsets-lungu/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 10:04:55 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/review-2021-landslides-for-african-incumbents-the-zambian-opposition-upsets-lungu/ Elections are a major item on the news agenda every year. 2021 was no different. Presidential, parliamentary and local elections have taken place across the continent. The incumbents have been retained and the rise in opposition has been observed elsewhere. As part of our review of the 2021 news calendar, Africanews looks back on the […]]]>

Elections are a major item on the news agenda every year. 2021 was no different. Presidential, parliamentary and local elections have taken place across the continent.

The incumbents have been retained and the rise in opposition has been observed elsewhere. As part of our review of the 2021 news calendar, Africanews looks back on the elections that took place in the various sub-regional blocks.

Presidential polls in East Africa – Uganda, Djibouti and Ethiopia

Longtime Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni was on the ballot again as he sought to extend his term. The polls were marred by a brutal crackdown on opposition voices on the grounds that COVID-19 meant the campaign had to be done online.

In the end, Museveni won the disputed election of January 14 by more than 6 million votes (58.38%) and thus secured his sixth consecutive mandate.

In Ethiopia, delayed parliamentary elections were held despite insecurity in some areas. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s Prosperity Party won majority seats, which helped him retain his post.

Abiy’s party won 410 seats out of a possible 547 seats in parliament, other parties and an independent candidate won 12 seats.

In Djibouti, the ballot was held on April 9 and President Ismail Omar Guelleh, stood for election against a single opponent and won a crushing ballot with 155,291 votes (97.30%) to extend his reign.

Surveys in West Africa – Gambia, Benin, Niger, São Tomé and Principe and Cape Verde

The Gambian elections were the first post-Yahya Jammeh elections. The coalition that toppled Jammeh in 2016 had collapsed and three key members, including incumbent Adama Barrow, were running.

Barrow’s new party, the National Patriotic Party, NPP, won the election with 457,519 votes (53.23%) although two main opposition parties contested the result.

On October 17 in Cape Verde, a former Prime Minister, José Maria Neves de (PAICV), was elected president after the two terms of President Jorge Carlos Fonseca.

Jose Maria Neves won 95,803 votes (51.73%), the now former candidate of the ruling MpD party, Carlos Veiga, with 78,474 votes (42.37%) to come in second.

On April 11, Benin also held presidential elections won by outgoing President Patrice Talon, but these were marred by the arrest and detention of key opposition candidates.

In the end, Talon collected 1,982,534 votes (86.30%) against 261,096 votes for his main opponent Alassane Soumanou (11.37%).

In Niger, the February 21, 2021 vote was a second round of the December 2020 elections which failed to produce an absolute winner.

In the end, the ruling party’s candidate, Mohamed Bazoum, won the ballot by 2,490,049 votes (55.67%), ensuring Niger’s first democratic handover since independence.

São Tomé and Principe held presidential elections on July 18, but the lack of a first-round winner pushed them to the second round. The vote of September 5, 2021 was won by the ruling party candidate Carlos Vila Nova who obtained 45,481 votes (57.54%), he succeeded Evaristo Carvalho.

Southern Africa – presidential in Zambia, local elections in South Africa

On August 12, 2021, Zambia won the biggest surprise of the election year when another veteran opposition candidate, Hakainde Hichelima (present for the sixth consecutive time), defeated incumbent President Edgar Lungu while Lungu was continuing his second and final term.

Hichelima received 2,852,348 votes (59.02%) against 1,870,780 votes for Lungu (38.71%).

The November 1 local elections in South Africa saw the ruling African National Congress, the ANC, register its lowest result since returning to black majority in 1994. The ANC won less than 50% of the total voices, corruption and mismanagement being cited as the main reasons for the bad show.

African National Congress = 14,531,908 votes (47.52%) down 8.13% from 2016 Democratic Alliance = 6,067,429 (24.57%) down 5.27% from 2016 results Economic Freedom Fighters = 3,223,828 (8.31%) an appreciation of 2.23% over 2016 results The only presidential election in Central Africa was held in the Republic of Congo.

On March 21, 2021, the vote was won by outgoing Denis Sassou Nguesso who polled 1,539,725 (88.40%) to extend his term of office by five years. Tragically, his main opponent, Guy Brice Parfait Kolelas, died on polling day.


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California researchers describe 70 new species in 2021 https://turismo-stp.org/california-researchers-describe-70-new-species-in-2021/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 12:11:44 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/california-researchers-describe-70-new-species-in-2021/ In 2021, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 70 new plant and animal species to the Tree of Life, enriching our understanding of the complex web of life on Earth and strengthening our ability to make conservation decisions. illuminated. The new species include 14 beetles, 12 sea slugs, nine ants, seven fish, six […]]]>

In 2021, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 70 new plant and animal species to the Tree of Life, enriching our understanding of the complex web of life on Earth and strengthening our ability to make conservation decisions. illuminated. The new species include 14 beetles, 12 sea slugs, nine ants, seven fish, six scorpions, five starfish, five flowering plants, four sharks, three spiders, two sea feathers, a moss, a pygmy pipehorse and a cécilien. More than a dozen scientists from the Academy, as well as several dozen international collaborators, have described the new species discoveries.

Proving that our vast and vibrant planet still contains unexplored places with plants and animals never before recorded, scientists have made their discoveries on five continents and three oceans, sifting through forest soils, venturing into vast deserts and diving into extreme ocean depths. Their findings help advance the Academy’s mission to regenerate the natural world through science, learning, and collaboration.

“Biodiversity is essential to the health of our planet and is being lost at a rate where sustainability practices are no longer sufficient,” says virologist and Academy Science Chief Shannon Bennett. “As stewards of our natural world, we must play an active role in the regeneration of ecosystems. Our relationship with nature improves with each new species, deepening our understanding of how our planet works and can better respond to an uncertain future. As we continue to fight climate change and a global pandemic, there has never been a more crucial time to protect the diversity of life on Earth. “

Below are the highlights of the 70 new species described by the Academy last year.

Weevils a victory for indigenous communities

Entomology Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Van Dam describes Pachyrhynchus obumanuvu, a brightly colored Easter egg weevil from the wooded peaks of the Philippines. At 3,000 feet (914 meters) above sea level, these weevils live in the canopy of the humid, moss-covered cloud forest. Unlike most weevils, which tend to be one color, P. obumanuvu features intricate patterns of iridescent yellows and greens. Its coloring mimics the traditional clothing of its namesake, the indigenous Obu Manuvu tribe.

But collaborating researcher Analyn Cabras had additional motivations for naming this species.

“We are in a race against time under the constant threat of forest degradation,” says Cabras. “Many insects can disappear before they are even discovered.” P. obumanuvu was found in a small patch of primary forest, one of the few remaining in the region due to centuries of agriculture and over-logging. Cabras notes the power of a name to instill a sense of pride and stewardship for a species within a community. It stresses the importance of continuous species identification, especially in regions facing rapid exploitation of natural resources. “How can we teach conservation and regeneration of wildlife,” asks Cabras, “if we can’t put a name on a face? ”

A new kind of pygmy pipehorse in the Pacific

If you take a close look at the sheer underwater cliffs off the coast of Northland, New Zealand, you will likely only see a wall of red coralline algae. But to the keen eye of research associate Graham Short, Cylix tupareomanaïa, a new species of pygmy pipehorse and close cousin of seahorses, can be found cleverly camouflaged by its environment. The discovery of this elusive species sheds light on a new genus of pipehorse, the first to be reported in New Zealand since 1921.

“This discovery highlights how little we know about New Zealand’s reefs that we have explored for centuries,” said Short. “If you dive a little deeper I think we’ll identify several other new species of fish. Short’s findings uncovered other undescribed species in the Cylix kind from South Africa to Seychelles.

The new genus was determined by comparing CT scans between C. tupareomanaia and other similar species in the region. Short and his named colleagues Cylix (Latin forcalyx ‘) for the cup-shaped bony structure on its crest, while other genera of pipehorse have a domed crest. The name of the species, tupareomanaïa, is Maori for “seahorse garland” and represents the first time that a Maori tribe has been implicated in the name of a species endemic to the Northland region.

Scorpios reach new heights

In the canopy of the tropical forests of the lowlands of Mexico, you will find unexpected residents: scorpions. This year, Islands 2030 Initiative co-lead and curator of arachnology Lauren Esposito and graduate student Aaron Goodman describe six new species of bark scorpions from Guatemala and Mexico. While people generally associate scorpions with arid desert climates, these bark scorpions find respite from predators, namely the larger scorpions, high in the treetops of undisturbed primary forests. One of the new scientific scorpions, Centruroides catemacoensis, has developed an extraordinary tactic to escape predators. With the ability to discern the rustling winds of an approaching predator, vs. catemacoensis abandon its perch at the first sign of a nearby threat, falling to the safety of the forest floor.

“Once they hit the leaf litter, you won’t find them,” Goodman says. Goodman used this to his advantage during nighttime surveys, tapping branches with PVC pipes to mimic predators and triggering scorpions to fall into the nets waiting below.

Cecilian detective in São Tomé

Since colonial times, biologists have questioned whether the São Tomé caecilian, a limbless burrowing amphibian, is one or two separate species. After carefully studying the genetic markers of 85 individuals from the island of São Tomé in the Gulf of Guinea, Islands 2030 co-lead of the initiative and curator of herpetology Rayna Bell provides the strongest evidence to date that the island is home to two unique species of Caecilians.

About 300,000 years ago, an explosion of volcanic activity streaked São Tomé with lava flows, dividing the island and the Caecilians into unique and isolated habitats. This separation likely caused the species to diverge as they acclimated to the environmental pressures of their new territories. As the lava flows eroded, the once impenetrable barriers disappeared, allowing the resulting two species to become neighbors again. Millennia of interbreeding and hybridization have since masked the presence of two species by blurring the genetic lines between them. While the long debate over this species is familiar, Bell’s discovery is a major step towards understanding and protecting the two São Tomé Caecilians.

Guitarfish scratches a new tune for fishing

Ichthyology research associate David Ebert describes two blue-dot sea guitars from Madagascar (Acroteriobatus andysabini) and Socotra (Acroteriobatus stehmanni). They are coastal rays with elongated bodies and flattened heads that look, you guessed it, like guitars. Due to their proximity to humans and their ability to be easily caught, these shark-like rays are among the most endangered of all cartilaginous fish.

A. andysabini, the larger of the two newly described species, was previously grouped with another species of sea guitar. This lack of taxonomic knowledge has been detrimental to the Malagasy sea guitar, as local small-scale fisheries continue to overfish without regulation. Ebert’s conclusion that there are in fact two distinct species put conservation at the forefront, helping to facilitate Madagascar’s first national action plan to protect sharks and rays.

Working with local fisheries to incorporate species identification into their practice, Ebert hopes for harmony between the Guitars of the Sea and the nearby coastal communities they support.

“How to manage the protection of species in a region where food security is a predominant problem?” Ebert asks. “It’s not just about protecting these animals; it’s about finding long-term solutions for stingrays and human populations.

Starfish shine on coral reefs

In the past year, invertebrate zoology research associate Christopher Mah, PhD, has described five echinoderms new to science – a group of marine animals that includes starfish, sea urchins, sea cucumbers and more – from Rapa Nui (Easter Island) and New Caledonia. After careful consideration of the images of a remote control vehicle and starfish specimens provided by Academy biologists and Hope for the reefs initiative co-leaders Luiz Rocha and Bart Shepherd, Mah described the Indo-Pacific starfish Uokeaster ahi.

Igniting the reef with its bright orange color, U. ahi aptly named for its fiery hue—ahi, meaning ‘fire’ in the Rapa Nui language. ‘Uokeaster ‘ is derived from the mythological sea deity Uoke, which, according to legend, submerged the once mainland Rapa Nui under the sea, leaving only its highest mountain peaks exposed. U. ahi resides in this “original” Rapa Nui – the reefs just below the surface.

Starfish greatly contribute to the health of coral reefs. Remove them and the ecosystem becomes unbalanced. So the more we know about them, the better we can protect these increasingly fragile ecosystems.

“You never know what benefit will be gained from studying the unknown,” says Mah, “whether it’s a tangible benefit as an anticancer drug or an ecological benefit in protecting coral reefs.” .

Republished courtesy of the California Academy of Sciences. Photo: This well-camouflaged pygmy pipehorse, Cylix tupareomanaia, represents a new genus and species of pipehorse, discovered off the coast of Northland, New Zealand. Credit: Richard Smith © 2021


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Saint Kitts and Nevis signs visa waiver agreement with African nation São Tomé and Príncipe https://turismo-stp.org/saint-kitts-and-nevis-signs-visa-waiver-agreement-with-african-nation-sao-tome-and-principe/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 02:00:59 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/saint-kitts-and-nevis-signs-visa-waiver-agreement-with-african-nation-sao-tome-and-principe/ Saint Kitts and Nevis signs visa waiver agreement with African nation São Tomé and Príncipe Saint Kitts and Nevis on Wednesday signed a visa waiver agreement with the African nation São Tomé and Príncipe through senior representatives of the two countries in New York. With the new signature with São Tomé and Principe, the Saint […]]]>
Saint Kitts and Nevis signs visa waiver agreement with African nation São Tomé and Príncipe

Saint Kitts and Nevis on Wednesday signed a visa waiver agreement with the African nation São Tomé and Príncipe through senior representatives of the two countries in New York.

With the new signature with São Tomé and Principe, the Saint Kitts and Nevis passport now allows visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 161 countries around the world. He took Saint Kitts and Nevis past Mexico and Israel and brought us closer to Barbados for the number one passport in the Caribbean region and number 24 in the world.

The Henley and Partners Passport Index released in 2021 placed Saint Kitts and Nevis passports 2nd in the Caribbean and 26th in the world. The Index, considered globally authoritative, said Saint Kitts and Nevis passports allow visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to some 157 countries around the world.

Before Saint Kitts and Nevis were Mexico and Israel, whose passports allowed visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 158 countries around the world. Mexico and Israel were tied for 25th in the world.

In the Caribbean, Barbados was ranked first and 24th in the world with visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 161 countries around the world.

A few months ago, Foreign Minister Mark Brantley visited Belgrade, Serbia, and signed visa waiver agreements with Palestine and with the African nations Burkina Faso and Gabon. These signatures allowed Saint Kitts and Nevis passports to access 160 countries around the world visa-free or visa-on-arrival.

In Serbia, Brantley has also started discussions on visa waiver agreements with the Minister of Foreign Affairs of São Tomé and Principe SE Edite do Ramos da Costa Ten Jua.

“I thank PS Kay Bass, our ambassadors and diplomatic staff at our various embassies and high commissions around the world for making this important milestone possible,” Brantley wrote.


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GEF Council’s work program includes projects on chemicals, waste and international water | News | SDG Knowledge Center https://turismo-stp.org/gef-councils-work-program-includes-projects-on-chemicals-waste-and-international-water-news-sdg-knowledge-center/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 23:41:48 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/gef-councils-work-program-includes-projects-on-chemicals-waste-and-international-water-news-sdg-knowledge-center/ The 61st meeting of the Board of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the 31st meeting of the Council of the Least Developed Countries (LDCF) and Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) adopted work programs for worth $ 210.32 million. Carlos Manuel Rodríguez, CEO and President of the GEF, stressed that the work program will contribute […]]]>

The 61st meeting of the Board of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the 31st meeting of the Council of the Least Developed Countries (LDCF) and Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) adopted work programs for worth $ 210.32 million.

Carlos Manuel Rodríguez, CEO and President of the GEF, stressed that the work program will contribute to efforts “to address environmental challenges in an integrated manner”, as well as a blue and green recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The GEF work program consists of 25 projects and one program. The 43 beneficiary countries include ten Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and 16 Small Island Developing States (SIDS). The program prioritizes the chemicals and waste focal area, and will address agricultural chemicals and their management. GEF focus areas related to biodiversity, climate change, chemicals and wastes, land degradation and international waters are also addressed in the program. In total, the work program amounts to $ 190.7 million and represents 5% of the entire GEF-7 replenishment.

The work program includes the following program, projects and beneficiary countries:

  • Funding for Agrochemical Reduction and Management (FARM) in Ecuador, India, Kenya, Lao PDR, Philippines, Uruguay, Viet Nam;
  • Implementation of the Fanga’uta Lagoon Stewardship Plan and replication of lessons learned in priority areas of Vava’u in Tonga;
  • Institutional capacity building to secure biodiversity conservation commitments in India;
  • Strengthening biodiversity governance systems for the sustainable management of living natural resources in Cabo Verde;
  • Energy efficiency of buildings in the Marshall Islands;
  • Towards Land Degradation Neutrality for Improved Equity, Sustainability and Resilience in Cabo Verde;
  • Sustainable management and restoration of degraded landscapes to achieve Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) in India;
  • Integrated management and environmentally sound disposal of POP pesticides and mercury in the health and agricultural sectors in Sri Lanka;
  • Improving the management of e-waste and healthcare waste to reduce emissions of unintentionally produced POPs (UPOP) in Egypt;
  • Improve the sustainable management of the Senegalese-Mauritanian aquifer system to ensure access to water for populations facing climate change (SMAS) in The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania and Senegal;
  • Strengthening environmental security and cross-border cooperation in the Golok / Kolok river basin, Malaysia and Thailand;
  • Strategies, technologies and social solutions to manage bycatch in fisheries of large tropical marine ecosystems in Barbados, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago;
  • Towards a sustainable and non-conversion aquaculture in the large marine ecosystem of the Indonesian seas in Indonesia and Timor-Leste;
  • Use of marine spatial planning in the Gulf of Guinea for the implementation of payment for ecosystem services and nature-based coastal solutions in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Togo;
  • Implement the strategic action program of the Drin basin to strengthen cross-border cooperation and enable the integrated management of natural resources in Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and North Macedonia;
  • Conservation and sustainable management of valuable land resources and ecosystems in the Lake Sevan basin for multiple benefits in Armenia;
  • Ensuring sustainable land management resilient to climate change and progressing towards land degradation neutrality in the Federated States of Micronesia;
  • Sustainable food systems and integrated land and seascape management in the Marshall Islands;
  • Support the sustainable and inclusive transformation of the blue economy in IOA SIDS in Cabo Verde, Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, Maldives, Mauritius, Sao Tome and Principe and Seychelles;
  • Promote sustainability in the agave-mezcal value chain through the restoration and integrated management of biocultural landscapes in Oaxaca, Mexico;
  • Promotion of sustainable approaches to ecosystem conservation in the Imatong landscape in South Sudan, UNEP;
  • Effectively manage networks of marine protected areas in the large marine ecosystems of the ASEAN region in Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand;
  • Sustainable management of mercury in the non-ferrous metal industry in China;
  • Achieve rapid decarbonization of the energy sector in Saint Kitts and Nevis;
  • Improve thermal energy efficiency in the design, manufacture and operation of industrial boilers for micro, small and medium enterprises with low carbon emissions in India; and
  • Green finance and sustainable agriculture in the dry forest ecoregion of Ecuador and Peru.

In addition, the 31st meeting of the LDCF / SCCF Council adopted a work program totaling USD 19.62 million for three projects to address urgent climate change adaptation priorities in three LDCs: Malawi, São Tomé and Príncipe and the Solomon Islands. This funding supports the following projects:

  • Integrated economic development and community resilience;
  • Transformational adaptation for climate resilience in the Lake Chilwa basin in Malawi; and
  • Co-management of climatic extremes for the resilience of agriculture through innovative technologies for irrigation in São Tomé and Príncipe.

Also during the GEF Council meeting, the leaders of the five conventions for which the GEF serves as the financial mechanism briefed the Council on preparations for negotiations on biodiversity, climate change, chemical pollutants, mercury and desertification. They discussed the priorities of the conventions during the eighth replenishment period of the GEF Trust Fund (GEF-8), as well as the pandemic-related delays in finalizing this contribution.

In addition to decisions on the work program, the Board engaged in a lengthy discussion of the GEF 2021 Progress Report and the Seventh Comprehensive Assessment of GEF Results and Performance. Speakers emphasized that the GEF is a learning organization, and discussions focused on recommendations that should be incorporated into the planning of GEF-8. The Council was also informed of the recent work of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Group (STAP) and its plans for the coming months.

The Council meeting concluded with a celebration of the 30th anniversary of the GEF.

A GEF Council consultation with civil society organizations (CSOs) took place on Friday, December 3, 2021, ahead of the 61st meeting of the GEF Council. The discussion focused on the theme “GEF-CSO Consultations on Youth-Led Advocacy and Solutions to the Global Environmental Crisis”.

Council meetings, which took place online from December 6-10, 2021. The next GEF Council meeting will be in June 2022. This meeting is expected to approve the conclusion of negotiations on GEF-8. This next four-year programming cycle will begin in July 2022. [ENB summary of the GEF and LDCF/SCCF Council meetings]


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On the “chocolate islands” of Africa, cocoa producers target the luxury market https://turismo-stp.org/on-the-chocolate-islands-of-africa-cocoa-producers-target-the-luxury-market/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 06:24:23 +0000 https://turismo-stp.org/on-the-chocolate-islands-of-africa-cocoa-producers-target-the-luxury-market/ São Tomé (AFP) – A piece of chocolate sits on the tongue and a strong but subtle flavor begins to blossom. “When the chocolate starts to soften, you bite into it”, orders chocolate maker Claudio Corallo. The chocolate tasting then extends to different flavors – ginger, coffee, pepper, sea salt – but at the base […]]]>

São Tomé (AFP) – A piece of chocolate sits on the tongue and a strong but subtle flavor begins to blossom.

“When the chocolate starts to soften, you bite into it”, orders chocolate maker Claudio Corallo.

The chocolate tasting then extends to different flavors – ginger, coffee, pepper, sea salt – but at the base of each of these delicacies is a land, a richness that comes from the cocoa trees that grow in volcanic soil, washed away by the tropical Atlantic breeze.

They grow in Sao Tome and Principe, a small island nation off the west coast of Africa that has a rich but also tragic association with chocolate.

Formerly called the “chocolate islands”, the Portuguese-speaking archipelago was the world’s largest producer of cocoa at the end of the 19th century.

Then, as competition intensified in the second half of the 20th century, the industry was almost wiped out. Many plantations have been abandoned, and their fields and buildings have been taken over by nature.

To test: Claudio Corallo’s chocolate workshop in Sao Tome. Cocoa grown in the volcanic soil of the islands has a complex flavor signature Adrien Marotte AFP

Today, however, there is talk of a comeback as a handful of entrepreneurs look to the growing global premium chocolate market.

“Focusing on quality is the only way to survive,” said Jean-Rémy Martin, a Frenchman who revived an old, dying plantation ten years ago on the island of Sao Tome, in Diogo Vaz. .

The place gave its name to a Martin chocolate brand created with his son. Her 82% organic “Grand Cru” chocolate – with “hints of flowers, smoke, spices and fruit” – sells to online shoppers in Europe for 6.40 euros ($ 7.42) a bar. .

Its expanse of 420 hectares (approximately 1,000 acres) sits on the slopes of an ancient volcano overlooking the Atlantic, using cocoa trees which are the descendants of plants imported by the Portuguese in the 18th century.

Mechanized agriculture on this land is impossible, but the trees grow under a lush natural canopy and in soil so fertile that Martin says chemical inputs can be dispensed with.

Growing cocoa, making chocolate

But going organic was not enough.

“We have organic certification, but growing the cocoa alone will not cover the costs,” Martin said. “We had to opt for 100% production”, taking charge of the whole chain from the chocolate pod.

The business model required a radical change.

The farm went from “a monoculture regime, where cocoa prices were determined by global buyers, to full control over our prices and increasing our cocoa in the value chain,” he said. declared.

Jean-Remy Martin has taken over a dying cocoa plantation to launch the successful premium chocolate brand Diogo Vaz
Jean-Remy Martin has taken over a dying cocoa plantation to launch the successful premium chocolate brand Diogo Vaz Adrien Marotte AFP

Since then, Diogo Vaz chocolate has gained an international reputation, winning numerous awards and making enough profit to create an ambitious and sustainable business.

About 250 people, almost all local, are employed by the company, which aims to replicate its success with the cultivation of fruits and vanilla, to be transformed into pastries and alcoholic beverages.

Corallo, an Italian from Florence, settled in Sao Tome in the early 90s and became a pioneer in the development of high-end cocoa.

He set up “laboratories” in his plantation on the island of Principe and his workshop in Sao Tome to try to unravel the unique taste signatures of cocoa grown on the archipelago.

“I don’t like chocolate myself,” Corallo mischievously told AFP, referring to his professional career as a coffee specialist.

Goat keepers: The Diogo Vaz cocoa plantation now has a bright future ahead of it thanks to its foray into premium chocolate
Goat keepers: The Diogo Vaz cocoa plantation now has a bright future ahead of it thanks to its foray into premium chocolate Adrien Marotte AFP

Corallo Chocolate has developed a growing and dedicated international customer base, although he said export logistics from a location more than 300 kilometers (185 miles) from the Gabonese coast were often a headache. head.

Sao Tome and Principe is one of a growing number of cocoa producing countries to target growing demand for organic products.

The global market is expected to grow by nearly 8% per year over the next five years, reaching $ 1.3 billion (€ 1.16 billion) by 2026, according to an industry study released in October.

Bittersweet story

Cocoa plantations are steeped in the history of the islands.

At the height of the industry at the end of the 19th century, the islands produced nearly 35,000 tonnes of cocoa per year, the fruit of the labor of thousands of immigrants from other African colonies of Portugal, Cape Verde, ‘Angola and Mozambique.

Agronomist Claudio Corallo has a background in coffee, but saw potential for Sao Tome in the growing premium chocolate market
Agronomist Claudio Corallo has a background in coffee, but saw potential for Sao Tome in the growing premium chocolate market Adrien Marotte AFP

But once the colonies gained independence in 1975, “the Portuguese left with their know-how, the plantations were hit by pest epidemics and the state redistributed land to former employees without any oversight. “said Maria Nazare Ceita, historian at the University. from Sao Tome.

“The production collapsed.”

“The whole population is linked to cocoa in one way or another,” Carlos Vila Nova, the country’s president, told AFP.

Just give me a jar: Chocolate test in Claudio Corallo's workshop
Just give me a jar: Chocolate test in Claudio Corallo’s workshop Adrien Marotte AFP

“With our know-how, we understand the product very well,” he said.

“In the globalized economy, we have to add value to cocoa. We must focus on quality. By extending the chain to processing, the cocoa business once again has a future.


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