LDS Church Announces New Chapels, Mission and Regional Leaders | News, Sports, Jobs


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The new Social Hall meeting venue in downtown Salt Lake.

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The lobby and entrance to the new Social Hall meeting room.

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The roof terrace of the Social Hall Meeting House.

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The main entrance to the meeting room from the social hall.

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A chapel in the meeting room of the social hall.

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Kyrylo Pokhylko, Area Seventy and Assistant in the Area Presidency, will oversee the Area of ​​The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Ukraine and Moldova.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced three post-conference updates this week.

Urban chapels

On Friday, a special media tour was held at the new Urban Chapels and Mixed-Use Building of Downtown Salt Lake City Business Offices.

“The idea came up to have a space for common use and to build an office tower and to combine that with a meeting place, and it is a very economical way to do it,” Bishop L said. Todd Budge of the Presiding Bishopric of the Church, who is overseeing construction. places of worship for the global faith.

“We started construction in April 2019. So it’s been about three years, but it’s a beautiful 25-story building,” Budge said. “The building is the third tallest in Salt Lake City, at 395 feet.”

The four-story, 39,000 square foot meeting house sits at the foot of the new 95 State office tower and has a separate address from the office tower. A steeple has been placed next to the entrance to the church which faces Social Hall Avenue, once the place where Latter-day Saint pioneers gathered for social events. The original structure, known as Social Hall, was built in 1852 under the direction of President Brigham Young.

“This downtown block has always been a place of gathering, a place of community,” said Emily Utt, curator of the Church’s history department. “It is rather exciting that there is now a new building almost on the same site which is a gathering place.”

A memorial with remnants of the original structure is enclosed in an underground tunnel entrance to the buildings.

The original social hall remained a site for social events until 1922. A century later, the location will be a gathering place for today’s urban Latter-day Saints. Church leaders have named the meetinghouse Social Hall Avenue Meetinghouse, located at 110 E. Social Hall Ave.

The new meeting place has two chapels, so it can accommodate two congregations at the same time, each with a capacity of 500 people. Six wards (congregations) will meet in the building, including two for young single adults. The Meeting House was built to accommodate a growing number of downtown residential complexes and promote a more walkable community.

“If (Brigham Young) was going up that escalator now, I think he’d be pretty surprised at what’s on that ground,” Budge said. “It will also be a very social place. … We have a beautiful terraced outdoor garden. And I can just see young single adults and young people meeting and socializing and building relationships with each other.

The development also includes a roof terrace, which can be used by office tenants during the day and church groups in the evening, and a Sunday school hall, where the Relief Society organization meets. women – with all the features of a traditional classroom combined with a spectacular view.

The unique development in Utah’s fast-growing capital models some of the church’s other urban meeting places in major cities around the world.

“New York, London, Brussels and Alexandria, Virginia are all expensive cities, and real estate is difficult to acquire. And so, we were able to make these kinds of joint-use facilities to make it a much more economical proposition,” Budge said.

“Having the office tower provides a source of revenue to pay for the place of worship. And so, we try to be wise stewards of these sacred resources that the Lord has blessed us with,” he added.

The tower and meeting house were developed by City Creek Reserve, a real estate investment affiliate of the church. Okland Construction was the general contractor. Church tithes were not used to build the office tower.

An open house will be held at the church meeting hall on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The dedication is scheduled for Sunday and will be led by Elder Kevin W. Pearson, Utah Area President.

New mission, another reinstated

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints creates a new mission in Spain. The Spain Madrid North mission will include areas of the existing Spain Madrid and Spain Barcelona missions.

The England Bristol mission will be reinstated, from the England Birmingham and England London missions. The boundaries of the Leeds mission in England will also be realigned with these changes.

Kevin E. and Janine D. Gallacher (currently serving in England’s Birmingham Mission since July 2021) will be reassigned to England’s Bristol Mission. Adam and Heather West will assume leadership of the English Birmingham Mission. Christopher L. and Trista S. Eastland will lead the Spain Madrid North mission.

These changes will take effect in early July and there will be a total of 411 missions worldwide.

Area management

Area leadership assignments were announced by the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The changes affect Zone Presidencies and will take effect on August 1, with the exception of Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and Northern Europe, which take effect immediately.

Members of Area Presidencies are General Authorities Seventies or Area Seventies. Region presidencies consist of a chair and two councilors who operate from regional offices in each assigned region.

These changes mean that there will be 23 zones in The Church of Jesus Christ – six that span the United States and Canada and 17 additional zones outside of those two countries, including a new North Europe zone and the Central Europe, which together will help oversee a space with a large number of issues, missions and languages ​​in the region.

The three Europe zones will be as follows:

Central Europe : Germany (area office), France, Poland, Albania, Georgia, Romania, Andorra, Greece, San Marino, Armenia, Hungary, Serbia, Austria, Italy, Slovenia, Azerbaijan, Kosovo, Slovakia, Belgium, Liechtenstein, Spain, Bosnia -Herzegovina, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Malta, Tajikistan, Croatia, Montenegro, Turkey, Cyprus, Netherlands, Turkmenistan, Czech Republic, North Macedonia and Uzbekistan.

Eastern Europe : Russia (area office), Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

North Europe : United Kingdom (area office), Greenland, Norway, Cape Verde, Iceland, Portugal, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia, Finland and Lithuania

Of note for church members is the following adjustment: “For the time being, Ukraine and Moldova will be separated and overseen by former Kyrylo Pokhylko in his role as assistant to the Europe region presidency. North,” the statement said.

Pokhylko, 44, of Kyiv, Ukraine, was ordained an Area Seventy in April 2020. At that time, he was president of the Baltic Mission. He is also a past branch president, a member of the stake presidency, and a stake president. He and his wife, Elena, have two children.

The Kyiv Ukraine Temple was dedicated August 29, 2010, by church president Thomas S. Monson, and is located in the village of Borshagivka outside Kyiv.

Beginning in 1984, zones were established to direct work in geographic locations of the world church. The United States and Canada Area Presidencies will work from church headquarters in Salt Lake City. The Middle East/North Africa region of the church is administered from headquarters.

“The Seventy are to act in the name of the Lord, under the direction of the Twelve … to build up the Church and settle all the affairs of it in all the nations,” according to Church information.



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